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10 Things You Should Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

10 Things You Should Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner


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Suggestions for unique, useful things to bring to a hosts’ home on Thanksgiving (besides flowers and wine)

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Artisanal Bread

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When you are worried about the turkey going dry and the pie burning in the oven, the last thing on your mind as a host may be something as small as bread. Offer to bring a few artisanal samples from a local bakery, or even attempt to bake your own before the holiday gathering.

Seasonal Coffee

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After turkey and copious amounts of wine, your belly will be full and your eyes will be shutting. Instead of bringing a bottle of wine to add to the sleepies, trying bringing some delicious seasonal coffee. Pumpkin is always a huge hit, but rich flavors like hazelnut and chai are always comforting in the colder months.

A Camera

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When you are running around a hot kitchen, the last thing on your mind is snapping photos. Be the day’s photographer and capture all of the special holiday moments. As a thank you to the host, you could later make a scrapbook so they can reminisce about their successful event.

Kitchen Emergency Kit

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There are so many things that can go wrong on a major holiday. Your host will appreciate a safety net — even if it's a small one! Pack a small bag of emergency items that could help your host get through the holiday. A timer, turkey twine, and an aloe plant are all great options for some of the major kitchen emergencies that could arise.

Board Games

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It may seem like a strange thing to pack along, but those that host a later dinner will definitely appreciate you bringing a distraction. With the chaos that ensues with even the smallest of families at holidays, it helps to have activities to keep rambunctious little ones and ornery older ones occupied while the host gets the meal ready.

Great Playlist

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Music can always set the tone for a great time. Before you leave the house, download a few playlists appropriate for the different phases of dinner. You could be a huge help to the host in making sure the mood is just right for the meal!

Chocolates

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Who doesn’t absolutely adore chocolates? Your host is going to get a ton of pies and big-name desserts, so sometimes bringing something small, flavorful, and decadent dessert is a nice treat after a huge feast.

A Football

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Grumbling stomachs can easy be distracted with the help of a fun activity. Send the hungry masses outside to toss around a football. Not only will the extra activity help them feel a little better about the big meal they are about to consume, but your host will be happy to have eager fingers out of their way!

Hostess Gift

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After slaving away all day at the stove, you wouldn’t believe how much a kind gesture is appreciated. Instead of bringing something related to the dinner, think outside the box and get a pampering present for your host for working so hard on a fabulous meal.

Movies

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After the turkey has settled and the cleanup is done, the host really won't have much energy to do anything. Why not bring by a classic Thanksgiving flick or even a Christmas movie to help kick off the new holiday season?


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:


11 Korean Dishes to Bring to Thanksgiving Dinner

San-jeok
Beef and vegetable skewers are another Korean holiday favorite. They are colorful and flavorful, which makes them perfect for a celebration. You can easily adapt this for vegetarians by skipping the beef and adding more vegetables. This dish can be made the day before.
San-jeok recipe

Yaksik
How about bringing a healthier dessert? Yasik is a dessert made with sweet rice, nuts and jujubes (Korean dates). Think of it as a rice-based granola bar sweetened with brown sugar or honey. It’s sweet enough to satisfy a dessert craving, yet light enough to balance out your heavy holiday meal.
Yaksik recipe

You’ve been invited to Thanksgiving dinner this year. Congrats! Question is, what do you bring? You could stick with the classic American Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, green bean casserole or even the standard pumpkin pie. Yet, why not shake things up a bit this year? Add a Korean kick to Thanksgiving dinner! Surprise your host or hostess with a delicious side dish that they will not forget.

With so many Korean entrees, appetizers and desserts to choose from, where should you start? The good news is that there are many options in Korean cuisine that will satisfy a range of tastes and/or diet restrictions. I have a blended Korean and American family, so my Thanksgiving table is always a combination of the two cultures. Here are some dishes that appear from time to time on my Thanksgiving table:



Comments:

  1. Antfortas

    I believe that you are wrong.

  2. Enzo

    Excuse me, I have thought and removed the message

  3. Duffy

    You are absolutely right. There's something about that, and I think it's a great idea.

  4. Gorre

    Enter we'll talk.

  5. Windgate

    BEAUTIFUL THANKS ...



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