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Celebrity Chef Judy Joo Opens New Restaurant in Hong Kong

Celebrity Chef Judy Joo Opens New Restaurant in Hong Kong


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Iron Chef Judy Joo has opened a new Korean restaurant inside the iconic California Tower in Hong Kong

Judy Joo has arrived in Hong Kong

Judy Joo, the Korean-American chef and TV personality, has opened a second iteration of her wildly successful London restaurant, Jinjuu, in the iconic Hong Kong skyscraper, the California Tower. This will be chef Joo’s first foray into the Asian restaurant market and brings a taste of modern and unique Korean food to the high-class dining culture in Hong Kong.

“Jinjuu is based on the Korean philosophy that drinking should always be accompanied by good food. At Jinjuu, the focus is as much on food as cocktails,” chef Joo said in a statement.

Jinjoo first opened up in London in 2014 and was immediately recognized that year by the Michelin Guide. This location of Jinjuu offers a mix of both classic and street fare, both of which are prevalent in Korean culinary culture.

Examples of menu items include Jinjuu Carnitas Fries, an assortment of Korean Tacos, K-Town Mini Slider Buns, Mandoo - Korean dumplings, Korean Fried Chicken, Ssam Platters, and Bibimbap Bowls. Desserts will be a French-Korean fusion and the bar program will host the largest soju selection in Hong Kong.


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


How Chef Judy Joo Went From the Trading Floor to Trading Recipes

After earning a Bachelor of Science in engineering, interning at Goldman Sachs, and working at Morgan Stanley, Judy Joo left Wall Street to follow her passion for cooking.

"I really just got sick of the grind. Fixed income derivatives wasn't really my passion," Judy Joo told Cheddar.

The Korean-American chef wasn't afraid to start back at the bottom and climb her way to the top of another industry. She described squeezing lemons and picking through spinach for hours at a time.

"It's so much more rewarding. I'm creating memories, where as before I felt like I was just pushing paper around," Joo said.

But she still relies on her Wall Street savvy. Her financial background provided her with an important skill-set that translates to the culinary world. "I can actually model spreadsheets and do all my own forecasting, which is really helpful because most chefs can't do that," Joo said.

In 2015, the celebrity chef opened her first restaurant, Jinjuu, in London. She wanted to create a "cool" restaurant that borrowed from her Korean-American heritage. She now has a second location operating in Hong Kong.

"I need to create a space that is really representative of, and really shows off, the true beauty of Korean culture in every sense of the word," she said.

Popular menu items include Philly cheesesteak dumplings and wild mushrooms and duck dumplings. Joo is a French-trained Londoner, so she incorporates different robust flavors from her multicultural background.

"I am trying to globalize Korean food," she said.

Joo has made her footprint both on and off screen. She is the mastermind behind the cookbook "Korean Food Made Simple," and serves as a host of the Cooking Channel's "Korean Food Made Simple."


Watch the video: Korean Food Made Simple with Judy Joo 2. New on TLC (July 2022).


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